Norman Edward Anderson

Son, Missing a Year, Presumed Dead, Mrs. M. Anderson Advised
Receives Letter from Secretary of Navy
Mrs. Marie Anderson, 1211 Main Street, widow of the late Edw. Anderson, is advised in a letter from Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox that her son, Norman Edward Anderson, 24, Seaman Second Class, United States Naval Reserve, reported missing in action a year ago, must now be presumed to be dead.

In his letter of condolence, the Secretary of the Navy points out that her son was traveling in a passenger status onboard a merchant ship, when it was torpedoed and sunk in the mid-Atlantic on February 7, 1943 and describes the rescue operations as carried out by American and Allied vessels.

In Service Over 2 Years
Norman Edward Anderson was born January 28, 1920 and was graduated from the senior high school here with the class of 1937. He enlisted in the Navy in September 1941 and was called into service April 1, 1942.

He received his training at the United States Naval Training Station at San Diego, CA, where he completed his course in the machinists' school. He was called to active duty in December 1942.

Besides his mother, he is survived by a brother, Corporal Gordon E. Anderson, USA, now stationed in England.

Text on Knox Letter
The text of Secretary Knox's letter to Mrs. Anderson follows:

"Your son, Norman Edward Anderson, Seaman Second Class, United States Naval Reserve, was traveling in a passenger status onboard a merchant ship, when that vessel was sunk as the result of being torpedoed without warning between 3 and 4 o'clock on 7 February 1943.

"This action occurred in mid-Atlantic. At the time of the torpedoing, the sea had moderate swells and the visibility was fair to poor, due to an overcast sky with no moon. Rescue operations were carried out by American and Allied vessels.

"In view of the time which has elapsed, and the severe weather conditions that prevailed at the time of the sinking, and considering the fact that no personnel on this ship has been reported prisoners of war, I am reluctantly forced to the conclusion that your son is deceased. Pursuant to section 5 of public law 490, as amended, his death is presumed to have occurred on 8 February 1944, which is the day following the day of the expiration of an absence of 12 months.

"It is deeply regretted that the hope, which you have held during these intervening months for the safe return of your son, must now be concluded. I extend to you my sincere sympathy in your sorrow. Sincerely yours, Frank Knox."