Henry G. Crowley

Eau Claire Airman was Among First Americans Over Berlin
AN EIGHTH AAF BOMBER STATION, England—Eight Wisconsin airmen were among the first Americans over Berlin in the historic first large-scale daylight bombing of war industries in the German capital. 

In the first Eighth Army Air Force bomber formations to sweep over the sprawling heart of Nazidom in a massed attack were Second Lieutenant Lester W. Bergemann, 23, of 1223 North 46th Street, Milwaukee, Flying Fortress copilot; Staff Sergeant Lawrence R. Chartier, 19, of 2240 South Woodward Street, Milwaukee, ball turret gunner; Second Lieutenant Henry G. Crowley, 22, of 607 Kendall Street, Eau Claire, co-pilot; Staff Sergeant Joseph S. Landowski, 35, of Amherst Junction, radio operator and gunner; Sergeant Anthony Orlikowski, 20, of Rural Route 2, Thiensville, radio operator and gunner; Sergeant Alvin D. Sparks, 24, of Hales Corners, tail gunner; Second Lieutenant Roger J. Sterr, 22, of Knowles, pilot; and Staff Sergeant Robert A. Netling, 19, of 812 West Davenport Street, Rhinelander, tail gunner. 

Describing the grueling air battle with hundreds of crack enemy fighters, Sergeant Chartier declared: "We were just inside Germany, when the fighters struck. They were single-engine jobs, with red, white, and yellow noses. Some were black; others silver. They played no favorites and attacked from every direction. My guns were barking at intervals for nearly five hours." 

Lieutenant Crowley described the Berlin attack as "an experience I'll never forget." He added, "all the way over, even through the terrific fighter attacks and the flak bursting all around, I kept thinking of one thing: we were going to Berlin, at last. When our bombs dropped onto our target in the big city, I felt as though we had taken a long step toward the end."


Missing in Action
LT. HENRY G. CROWLEY
Mr. and Mrs. John Crowley, 607 Kendall Street, have received word from the War Department that their son, Second Lieutenant Henry G. Crowley, has been reported missing in action over Germany since April 29.

Lieutenant Crowley, 22, was co-pilot of an Eighth Army Air Force Flying Fortress. On April 17, word was received that he had been awarded the Air Medal, after taking part in five missions over Germany.


Lt. H. G. Crowley Is a Prisoner of War in Germany
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Crowley, 607 Kendall Street, yesterday received word from the International Red Cross that their son, Lieutenant Henry G. Crowley, 22, is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Lieutenant Crowley, co-pilot of a Flying Fortress, who was one of the first American airmen to fly over Berlin, was reported missing in action in a bombing raid over the German capital on April 29.


Pilot Freed From Nazi Prison Camp
LT. HENRY G. CROWLEY
Mr. and Mrs. John Crowley, Kendall Street, have received a V-mail letter from their son, Lieutenant Henry G. Crowley, who was one of the American aviators released from the German prison camp at Moosberg. 

Lieutenant Crowley wrote from St. Valerie, near Le Havre, France. He had been a prisoner for a year, since his plane was shot down over Germany on April 29, 1944. He was co-pilot of an Eighth Army Air Force Flying Fortress.

Lieutenant Crowley has been awarded the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters.


At Least 3 Eau Claire Boys Believed to Be Among 27,000 Prisoners Liberated Sunday
At least three Eau Claire boys are believed to have been among the 27,000 Allied war prisoners liberated Sunday from the Nazi prison camp near Moosburg, 27 miles northeast of Munich, when the U.S. 14th Armored Division dashed into the camp, known as Stalag 7-1A.

They are Captain Thomas R. Litchfield, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. R Litchfield, 1411 South Farwell Street, pilot of a P-47 Thunderbolt and who had been missing in action since July 31 over France and later reported a prisoner of war; Lieutenant Henry G. Crowley, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Crowley, 607 Kendall Street, co-pilot on an Eighth Army Air Force Flying Fortress, reported missing in action over Germany since April 29, 1944 and afterwards reported a prison of war; and Sergeant Jack V. Wolf, son of Mrs. Lucy Wolf, 324 Fifth Avenue, Engineer Gunner, Army Air Corps, reported missing over Germany on February 25, 1944 and later reported a prisoner of war. Sergeant Wolf was serving on a Flying Fortress at the time.

No specific word has been received by their families here that they were among those released, but they had received word some days ago from the War Department to the effect that they had been removed from other prison camps to Stalag 7. They felt certain their sons were among the fortunate ones. When their families here heard the broadcasts Sunday, announcing that prisoners at Stalag 7 had been liberated, they were overjoyed and are anxiously awaiting further word.

That this camp was in fairly satisfactory condition and that the prisoners were found with a 10-day supply of Red Cross rations is indicated by the following dispatch, dated April 30:

27,000 PRISONERS FREED
WITH THE U.S. THIRD ARMY, April 30—(AP)—The U.S. 14th Armored  Division liberated 27,000 Allied prisoners yesterday, including a large percentage of American airmen, at a prison camp near Moosburg, 27 miles northeast of Munich. The liberation followed a nine-mile dash by the 14th Armored to the vicinity of Moosburg. The Germans had marched the prisoners there in recent days from various parts of Germany. A brief report said the captives were found with a 10-day supply of Red Cross rations on hand and that sanitary conditions and water supply were found satisfactory. The prison at Moosburg is Stalag 7-1A.