Marvin James Lawrence

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lawrence, 117 1/2 West Grand Avenue, received word Friday from the Secretary of War that their son, Staff Sergeant Stanley O. Lawrence, was reported missing in action over New Guinea on March 22.  

Staff Sergeant Lawrence left Eau Claire with the National Guard in 1940 and, after early training in Louisiana, he transferred to the Army Air Forces and became an Aerial Gunner, serving in bomber crews. 

He served in the Hawaiian Islands, Australia, and New Guinea, seeing considerable action in the South Pacific Theater of Operations. 

Sometime ago, he was awarded an Air Medal for meritorious achievement while  participating in an aerial flight over the Bismarck Sea. Lieutenant General George O. Kenny, commanding the Fifth Air Force, wrote to the Sergeant's parents, at that time, and telling of the award. The General wrote of Staff Sergeant Lawrence, as follows: 

"He was a member of the crew of a B-25- type aircraft which was one of a formation engaged in a bombing attack on an enemy convoy. Despite interception by enemy fighters, a bombing run was made in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire and at least one direct hit and three  near misses were  scored on the leading ship of the convoy. Two of the intercepting planes were destroyed, while hits were scored on at least two others. Your son's aircraft reduced speed in order to protect a crippled airplane, which had been damaged by enemy fire and, taking advantage of cloud cover, skillfully led the flight back to base."

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence have another son in service, Marvin James Lawrence, Seaman Second Class, now serving in the Navy at New Orleans.


Two Eau Claire Seamen Complete Gun Crew Tours
NEW ORLEANS, LAŚRobert Leroy Fleming, Seaman First Class, United States Naval Reserve, has returned to the Armed Guard Center here from 12 months at sea, as member of the Navy gun crew aboard a merchant ship.

His travels included a trip to the Normandy beachhead. He has visited ports in Iceland, England, Russia, France, Africa, Italy, and South America.

Fleming is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Fleming, 727 Water Street, Eau Claire, and was employed by the Gillette Rubber Company, before entering Naval Service June 21, 1942. He is a graduate of Eau Claire High School.

Marvin J. Lawrence, Seaman First Class, USNR, of Eau Claire, has returned to the Armed Guard Center here, after six months at sea, as member of the Navy gun crew aboard a merchant ship.

Lawrence, who enlisted in the Navy in April 1943, took his boot training here and now has credit for 13 months sea duty. Duties afloat have taken him to Chile, Brazil, Panama, Trinidad, and Cuba.

His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lawrence, live at 117 1/2 West Grand Avenue.


Staff Sergeant Stanley C. Lawrence, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lawrence, 117 1/2 West Grand Avenue, was recently awarded an Air Medal for service in New Guinea. 

He entered the service with the National Guard in October 1940 and received his training in Louisiana, Florida, Mississippi, and Dayton, Ohio. He served in the Hawaiian Islands, Australia, and at New Guinea. 

He has a brother, Marvin James, United States Navy, now stationed in Louisiana.  

The following letter was written to Mrs. Lawrence by Lieutenant General George C. Kenney, Commanding Officer of the Fifth Air force, describing the raid in which Staff Sergeant Lawrence received the medal:

"Dear Mrs. Lawrence: 

"Recently, your son, Staff Sergeant Stanley C. Lawrence, was decorated with the Air Medal. It was an award made in recognition of courageous service to his combat organization, his fellow American airmen, his country, his home, and to you. 

"He was cited for meritorious achievement while participating in an aerial flight over the Bismarck Sea near New Britain. 

"He was a member of the crew  of a B-25- type aircraft which was one of a formation engaged in a bombing attack on an enemy convoy. Despite interception by enemy fighters, a bombing run was made in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, and at least one direct hit and three near misses were scored on the leading ship of the convoy. Two of the intercepting planes were destroyed, while hits were scored on at least three others. Your son's aircraft reduced speed, in order to protect a crippled airplane, which had been damaged by enemy fire and, taking advantage of cloud cover, skillfully led the flight back to the base.

"Almost every hour of every day, your son and the sons of other American mothers, are doing just such things as that, here in the Southwest Pacific.

"Theirs is a very real and very tangible contribution to victory and to peace.

"I would like to tell you how genuinely proud I am to have men such as your son in my command, and how gratified I am to know that young Americans with such courage and resourcefulness are fighting our country's battle against the aggressor nations.

"You, Mrs. Lawrence, have every reason to share that pride and gratification.

"Very sincerely,  George C. Kenney,  Lieutenant General, Commanding."