Alice Ann (McDonald) Miller

In England
2ND LT. ALICE MILLER
Word has been received that Second Lieutenant Alice Ann Miller has arrived safely in England. She is the daughter of Mrs. Mary Jane McDonald, 613 South Dewey Street. 

Lieutenant Miller attended Eau Clare Public Schools and graduated in January 1925. In September 1928, she took up nurse's training at the Lake View Hospital of Chicago IL, graduating in June 1931.

Second Lieutenant Miller joined the Army Nurses Corps in April 1943. She received her training at Fort Knox, KY and A.P. Hill Military Reservation, VA. Before entering the Army Nurses Corps, she was supervisor of a Children's Orthopedic Hospital at Akron, OH.


War Correspondent Pays Tribute in Radio Talk to Army Nurse from Eau Claire
In a broadcast from London heard Saturday over radio station WLS and rebroadcast early this morning, Ervin G. Lewis, war correspondent, paid the following tribute to Second Lieutenant Alice Miller of the Army Nurse Corps, formerly of this city. Lewis said:

"Alice McDonald—that was her name before marriage—was educated in Eau Claire Public Schools. She completed high school there in 1925. Three years later, she took up the career of civilian nursing. Her 15 years in the field included graduation at Lakeview Hospital and affiliation at Cook County Hospital, both in Chicago. She says it was at Cook County Hospital she learned the technique of giving intravenous injections. Today that knowledge is helping to save American lives in France.

"It was a well-qualified nurse who prefixed a Second Lieutenancy to her name as Army Nurse in April 1943 but not until she had changed her last name nearly a year earlier by marrying Clayton L. Miller of Salem, OR. He is now a Sergeant in General Patton's Army. One of Alice's brothers is also with Patton's Army and another is at Camp Lee, VA. 

"Seven months after joining the Army  Nurse Corps—seven intensive months of training in hospitals and  open field—Nurse Miller was in England, preparing for D-Day. Her group, the 67th Evacuation Hospital, had made such a good showing, it was chosen as the third nurses' group to land in France. That was 11 days after D-Day. 

"She well recalls that the group's  first period of action lasted four weeks—twice as long as the ordinary period of unrelieved duty and the longest of any hospital group in France. The 67th, commanded by Colonel John. L. Crawford, with Captain Jean Truckey of Detroit as Chief  Nurse, had thousands of patients during that time, most of them operation cases from battle action. Yet the death loss was approximately 1 1/2 percent, which is remarkably low, especially considering that many of the patients were French or German prisoners of war. Lieutenant Miller attributes this record largely to the use of blood plasma, penicillin, whole blood, and sulfa drugs.

"She praised those persons who have made group donations of blood to the Red Cross. She said that on those occasions, when the supply at the front ran out, the enlisted men or even the nurses themselves in some hospital groups gave blood transfusions; then continued with their regular duties. 

"Ordinarily, a nurse in the 67th Evacuation Hospital has only these things to do: work a 12-hour shift from noon to midnight or midnight to noon, administer 15 to 20 blood transfusion in that time, or assist in operations; then in her spare time, do her own laundry, clean her shoes, keep up her appearance, sleep perhaps six or seven hours—if the guns and bombs up front aren't making too much noise—and try to write letters home. Then the whole hospital must pick up its tents every few days and move forward to keep up with the fast-moving Army. 

"'At first we didn't see how we could do the job,' Lieutenant Miller told us, while on a flying trip to London. 'But then it had to be done, so we did it.  Everyone cooperated and helped the others, and it was much easier.' She might have added that she herself  made it much easier by her seemingly tireless activities. These are officially described in an award of the Bronze Star Medal. The citation says, in part:

"Lieutenant Miller was in charge of post-operative care of the critically wounded and her kindly, tireless efforts in administering to the needs of more than 400 patients gave them great comfort during their recuperative period. She planned and constructed a traction device of otherwise worthless material which helped to make her patients more comfortable. Her superior qualities of good judgment, initiative, leadership, and devotion to duty reflect high credit upon herself and upon her branch of the military service.

"The citation will be seconded by many a soldier who might not be alive today if it weren't for the work of Alice Miller and her fellow nurses and doctors. It would also be seconded by dozens of men who have told your correspondent: 'Praise the medics in your broadcasts, because from the front lines to the evacuation hospitals, there are no greater heroes as far as we're concerned. Some of the medics have not only been with us at the front— they've been ahead of us—right out in the open, picking up wounded men in the face of enemy fire which had some of us regular troops hesitating to show ourselves. And the nurses are heroic too—working themselves to exhaustion—real angels of mercy'."


City Nurse First to Receive Medal for Service in France
2ND LT. ALICE MILLER
WASHINGTON, August 21(UP) A Wisconsin Army nurse has received the first decoration given to a woman in the Armed Services for meritorious service in France, it was learned Saturday.

She is Second Lieutenant Alice A. Miller, 613 South Dewey Street, Eau Claire, WI, whose service in support of combat troops between June 19 and July 9 merited her the Bronze Star Medal. This award brings to 106 the number of women who have received awards and citations for services to the United States to date.

According to the Office of War Information, by far the largest number of awards have gone to members of the Army Nurse Corps, 97 of whom have been singled out for [**data missing**]

MILWAUKEE, August 21 (AP)—Lieutenant Miller is the daughter of Mrs. Mary Jane McDonald, 613 South Dewey Street. She attended Eau Claire Public Schools and graduated in January 1925. In September 1928, she took up nurse's training at the Lake View Hospital, Chicago, IL, graduating in June 1931.

Lieutenant Miller joined the Army Nurses Corps in April 1943. She received her training at Fort Knox, KY and A. P. Hill Military Reservation, VA. Before entering the Army Nurses Corps, she was supervisor of a Children's Orthopedic Hospital at Akron, OH.