Charles E. Weber

PFC. C. E. Weber Injured In Action In South Pacific
PFC. CHARLES WEBER
Private First Class Charles E. Weber has been reported injured in action in the South Pacific area, according to his wife, who resides at 217 North Ninth Street.

Private First Class Weber had just arrived overseas in the South Pacific area. He is with the Ordnance Department.

He entered the service on October 31, 1942 and received his training at Camp Robinson, AR; St. Louis, MO; Louisiana; and Yuma, AZ.

Private First Class Weber has two brothers also serving overseas, Staff Sergeant Gerald M. Weber, somewhere in India, and Sergeant Eugene O. Weber, somewhere in Africa.


Eau Claire Man on Transport Torpedoed, Sunk in S. Pacific
Corporal C. E. Weber Among 1,359 Survivors
CORP. CHARLES E. WEBER 
Corporal Charles E. Weber, with the U.S. Ordnance Department, of 217 North Ninth Street, was among the survivors of the troop transport, the U.S. Cape San Juan, torpedoed and sunk in shark-infested Pacific waters late last fall, in which 70 lives were lost, according to a letter, dated May 23, 1944, received by his wife.

"What were you doing on Armistice Day while I was floating around on a life raft?" was one of the questions Corporal Weber asked in his letter, in which he told of floating around on a life raft for 30 hours, before being picked up.

Of the 1,359 rescued, 443 men were picked up by another American merchantman, 868 men by a U.S. destroyer and 48 men by a Pan-American Airways flying boat that made a hazardous landing in a heavy sea.

An official description of the rescue said that "sharks increased the peril of the men in the water, but, in disregard of their own safety,  crewmen of the San Juan (the destroyer) repeatedly plunged overboard and rescued exhausted soldiers." 

News of the sinking of the transport was made public only recently.

Corporal Weber entered the service on October 31, 1942 and received his training at Camp Robinson, AR;  St. Louis, MO; Louisiana; and Yuma, AZ.

Corporal Weber has two brothers also serving overseas, Staff Sergeant Gerald M. Weber, somewhere in India, and Sergeant Eugene O. Weber, somewhere in Africa.

Describes Experiences
Describing his experiences, after the torpedoing of the Army transport, Corporal Weber wrote his wife as follows:

"5-23-44, New Guinea

"Dearest Dorothy: Well, Dear, I can tell you a little about my trip when I left the states for overseas. Our boat was torpedoed, which you, no doubt, know about by this time. They made out some copies of the whole incident which I am inclosing. What were you doing on Armistice Day while I was floating around on a life raft? 

"I was sleeping on deck when it hit and, a few minutes later, I was on a life raft. When they gave the order to abandon ship, I didn't hesitate any.

"I think they should have given the Navy boys a little more credit, as they went way beyond their line of duty to rescue men. When I got on the destroyer, one of the Navy boys gave me a complete suit of his clothes. I wish I could have kept it as a souvenir, but I had to turn it in when I got to the Fiji Islands. 

I was first picked up by a sub-chaser and later transferred to the destroyer. The crew on the sub-chaser made hot coffee and flap packs and passed out all their cigarettes, candy, etc., that they had with them. The Navy boys on the destroyer did the same for us also.

"I was on a life raft for about 30 hours. Boy, was it a sight for sore eyes when we saw those boats in the distance coming to pick us up...."


The Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal have been awarded to Staff Sergeant Gerald M. Weber, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Weber, 114 Locust Street. Gerald was recently home on a 30-day delay route, after completing 44 missions in the India, Burma and China Campaign.

He is now stationed at Columbia, SC, as an Army aerial engineer instructor. Previous to this assignment, he spent a three-week rest period at the Atlantic Towers Hotel, a redistribution station at Miami Beach, FL. 

Staff Sergeant Weber enlisted in the Army in March 1942 and was graduated from the Army Air Forces Technical Training Command School at Keesler Field, MS. An advanced course in engineering was completed at the Columbia Air Base in South Carolina. He later completed a course at the Flexible Gunnery School at Tyndall Field, where he received his wings and qualified as an aerial gunner and aerial engineer. 

He received further training at Greenville, SC; Daniel Field, GA; and Myrtle Beach, FL. 

Sergeant Eugene Weber, a brother, is a bombardier in the Air Corps and is stationed on the island of Corsica. Another brother, Corporal Charles Weber, is stationed in New Guinea with an Army ordnance unit.